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About this collection

 

Civil District Court docket number 119511 filed on March 1, 1917, Lulu White vs the City of New Orleans was filed to bar the City from forcing White to sell her property (which included her brothel), due to the segregation of Storyville.  While White won this case, Storyville would be shut down less than a year late.

 

Lulu White was one of the most notorious and financially successful madams in New Orleans’s Storyville. Established in 1897, Storyville was a red-light district in which prostitution and other vices were tolerated though not legalized. White defied the segregation laws by claiming that she and the workers in her house were octoroons (one-eighth black). 

 

Over the course of her life, White was arrested for crimes such as: running a disorderly house, selling liquor illegally, petty crimes, some violent incidents and once for attempted murder. Yet she did not White did not serve and time in jail until after the closure of Storyville on November 12, 1917. On November 6, 1918, White was arrested for In 1918, White was convicted of violating the Draft Act, by promoting prostitution within ten miles of a military facility and she was sentenced to one year and a day.  Due to a pardon for medical reasons, she served about three months.  Lulu White was the proprietor of a brothel, until her death in 1931.

 

 
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